People

Julian D. Marshall

Julian D. Marshall John R. Kiely Endowed Professor

  jdmarsh@uw.edu
  206-685-2591
  Wilcox 268
 Marshall Research Group
 CV

Education

  • Ph.D., Energy & Resources, UC Berkeley, 2005
  • M.S., Energy & Resources, UC Berkeley, 2002
  • B.S.E., Chemical Engineering, Princeton University, 1996

Biography

My research is in exposure assessment: understanding how much pollution people breathe, and how to reduce those exposures. My specific areas of focus are (1) Air pollution impacts of urban form; (2) Air pollution and health impacts of transportation energy consumption, including alternative fuels (biofuels, electric vehicles) and active travel (walking, biking); (3) In situ measurement of fine particles in developing countries.

Two core themes underlying those areas are modeling and measuring spatiotemporal variability in pollution concentrations; and environmental justice: understanding who is more exposed or less exposed to air pollution, how exposures correlate with attributes such as race or income, and how changes in emissions might shift existing exposure gaps.

Awards and Honors

  • John R. Kiely Professor​ship, University of Washington, 2016 - present
  • Charles E. Bowers Teaching Award, ​University of Minnesota (​UMN​), 2014
  • C. Eugene Allen Award for Innovative International Initiatives (awarded to the Acara program), UMN, 2014
  • Joan M. Daisey Outstanding Young Scientist Award, International Society of Exposure Science, 2013
  • McKnight Land-Grant Professorship, UMN, 2009–2011
  • Young Engineer of the Year, American Society of Civil Engineers, Minnesota Section, 2009
  • One article (Ji et al., 2012) on the “most read” list from Environmental Science & Technology
  • One article (Marshall and Toffel, 2005) on the “most downloaded” list from Environmental Science & Technology
  • Two articles (Marshall, McKone, et al., 2005; Marshall, Nethery, et al., 2008) on the “most downloaded” list from Atmospheric Environment
  • Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor Award, U.C. Berkeley, 2005. Award states: “Each year, fewer than 10% of GSIs earn this distinguished award”